Outlining for NaNoWriMo

crest-bda7b7a6e1b57bb9fb8ce9772b8faafbIf you’re just coming across this now, at the beginning of October, there’s still plenty of time to plan a story from scratch. Here is a list of posts I’ve made about NaNo, which includes starting with story seeds and beginning to develop a plot. I’m not finished with that series of posts, as I wanted to give people time to work on the various steps. Personally, I’m still in the “take a nugget of a plot and see what you can flesh out of it” stage myself. However, I think this is a good time to talk about outlining, in case anyone is ready for that step.

The Great Debate

This isn’t a new topic. Even I have discussed the debate between panters and planners more than once before. I’ve been doing a lot of reading about others’ NaNo prep on WordPress in the last month, and have come to a few conclusions about pantsing and planning: Most pantsers actually do some planning, but not enough to consider themselves planners. Most planners leave room to pants along the way, but still find that they need to have a certain amount of stuff planned in advance.

So basically, there are extreme panters–all they know at the beginning of NaNo is a basic idea like, “It’s set on Mars and involves werewolves.” Or more of a plot point like, “Everywhere she goes, Sarah hears voices. She thinks she’s schizophrenic until the things the voices say start coming true.” With no more than that basic idea, they start writing on November 1st and just let the words flow out of them.

There are extreme planners–they have a 10,000-word outline, detailed character sheets for everyone down to the MC’s hairdresser, and a notebook full of notes about the world they’ve built.

Most of us fall somewhere in between these extremes–plan a little and wing most of it, or plan a lot but still let the story change itself. And I’ve noticed that many panters think that having an outline before starting to write the story means you’re locked into what is in that outline.

The Case for Outlining

Let me just say right now that most planners do give themselves room to follow the story or characters in unexpected directions. Sometimes, I write 2/3 of an outline, then start writing, knowing that I’ll veer off the outline before I get to the end anyway. Or I’ll change the outline to suit the new direction, or throw it out completely. Not too long ago I took a little offense at a blogger who implied that pantsing was creative, and writing from an outline wasn’t. Don’t take my tone to be too severe here, but I’d just like to state that writing fiction is creating, no matter what way you go about it. Simply because I do more of my creating before I start the actual writing by no means makes it less creative.

And let me just put this out there–the more you plan before you write, the more intricate your story can be. You can weave subplots together, work in foreshadowing more easily, and find plot holes before you’ve written them into the story. Outlining doesn’t make your story perfect, but I do believe it adds more potential for depth.

One more reason that I find planning to be important is that if I don’t write down ideas as I have them, and get them into place in the story, I will simply forget them. Even for this post, when I was falling asleep last night, I had an idea for a random plot point for the example up above. I really liked it, even if it was just an illustration. By this evening, I’d forgotten it completely.

Types of Outlines

1.) Perhaps the first thing that comes to most people’s minds when they hear the word “outline” is the formal outline. You know the kind–with the roman numerals and indentation and such. outlineThey provide some scene organization and truly, if this works for you, great! Though they always made writing research projects easier, I still disliked making these in school. And a few years ago, I tried to make one for my NaNo project anyway. About 1/4 of the way through the outline, I decided it was more difficult than it was worth and switched to my normal way of outlining.

outline2.) My outlines usually look like this. Actually, they’re normally handwritten, but this one I typed was easier to share. I simply write plot point after plot point, events as I want them to happen. Sometimes a single line in the outline is so broad that it takes several pages to write that plot point. Sometimes the story flows quickly through several pages of outline. The important thing is that I’m getting down, in order, what I want the story to look like. And sometimes the details don’t require much extra thought during the writing (which, by the way, can be really helpful during NaNo…less slowing down to think of what else should happen means I get the words out faster). But sometimes the outline only tells me that “MC grows up after the important thing happens at the beginning of the story,” and I end up spending several thousand words making up things that happened to him while he was growing up.

3.) I recently learned about worksheets and templates for outlining. I knew of them for characters, so it makes sense that they’d exist for outlining too. If you think you’d benefit from having a template, you may try doing a web search for one that works for you. From what I can tell, there are those that give you lines to fill in an introduction, several plot points with supporting material, a climax, and a conclusion. Or there are some that show the image of a story (sort of like a mountain) and tell you to fill in the points along the way. If you’re new to fiction writing or even just new to outlining, perhaps the structure would help.

4.) Another way of outlining or plotting I have heard of, but never tried, is making a plot board. Some sort of board on which you place individual cards, post-its, whatever, each one of which is a different plot point or detail. You can color code it (which to my thinking would come in handy to show different subplots), see it all at a glance, and move points around as you need to. Something like this can probably be done on different mediums, and there are probably online that you can find better information on this than I can provide.

I personally plan to try outlining in Scrivener this year. I still have the free trial, though it won’t last all through November. But I’m still testing out different aspects of the program to decide if it’s worth buying. Since you can create a new scene for each outline point and then write directly into the scene space, thus organizing your story as you write, it seems like a nice tool…I’m just not sure how it will work for me in practice.

During October

Wherever you may be in your NaNo prep, I strongly advise that you start gearing up for NaNo now (if you haven’t already been). It’s not that it’s impossible to dive right in on Nov. 1 and win, but there are certainly ways to make it easier. As I’ve mentioned before, making writing part of every day now will make needing to do that in November easier. Even if you only spend 15 minutes per day free writing or working on novel planning, you can start building the habit now.

Are you gearing up for NaNo too? Do you have a different style of outlining?

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9 thoughts on “Outlining for NaNoWriMo

  1. Okay, well if 10,00 word outline is extreme, than I am an extreme extreme planner!! One time I had an outline that was 20,000 words long (40plus pages). This NaNo will be my most extreme, I plan on outlining 3 novels! Though I love the way you outline, it sounds a lot like mine. Great post!

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    • I probably should have checked the word count on some of my outlines before calling 10,000 extreme. The one I shared a little of was almost 5000 words, and I know the outline I made the year before by hand was much longer and more in depth. However, 20,000 *does* still sound pretty extreme to me.

      You’re writing 3 novels for NaNo? Will they each be at least 50,000 words?

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        • I never really understand how people can know in advance how many words a story will be. Or how many chapters. Scenes so often come out to be longer or shorter than I’d expected, and of course new ideas hit during the writing. I mean, I know it’s probably a guess when people call it in advance too, but I can’t even try to guess. Sounds like you’ll be going way past 50k this year!

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  2. I’m not doing a whole lot of planning, but I think I’m going to have to for NaNo. I’m working on characters this week. Then I’ll spend a week or two trying to finalize some things like where exactly all the things running around in my head are going to take place once I put them on paper.

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    • I’ve heard of people who are normally panters but realize that to succeed at NaNo, they’re better off planning. Some of them decide planning isn’t so bad and start to go more to that side even outside of NaNo, and others still enjoy pantsing when they can. Maybe you’ll learn something about yourself as a writer from this experience!

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  3. This post is great! I’m currently poring at my Evernote and browsing through websites on prepping for Nano. I have a theme for my novel and the main characters ready but it’s lacking in the story development and climax department. And this worries me much~ I feel like too much reading is messing things up.

    *taking a deep breath* I shall go over your seeds again today and the plot post (which I haven’t read) and see if I can find any clue about taking my story into its plotting course.

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    • Sometimes you do have to stop reading about how to write (or in this case, how to plan) and just do it. I have been pulling together my ideas lately too. I’m not ready to outline at all yet. In fact, the main conflict has changed from my original idea just in the last few days. I have a mess of things I want to happen, but no real idea about the order yet. My main character feels boring and I have a lot of secondary characters who need names still.

      Though I do have enough to be developing still, I try to do some sort of free writing with a prompt of some kind when I have a chance. You never know what might pop into your head. Another idea is to just start writing out things that *could* happen, asking questions about why, and answering them. Just write everything that comes and keep coming back to it, adding to it, and circling (or highlighting, or somehow making it stand out) what you like and what to use. Don’t erase the other stuff though, because you may want to come back to it sometime.

      I start to panic sometimes if a story sits for a long time without any new ideas coming, especially when it’s awaiting important things like a climax, or a whole middle section. But there’s still time, and in the end, if November comes and you feel there are still holes, sometimes once you start the writing and get some of it down, you’ll find the writing leading you to something you otherwise never would have thought of.

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      • Thanks so much for sharing your writing journey, I find the writing things that *could* happen and keep asking questions method is a very useful tip 😀

        And your comments are spot on! I’m feeling exactly the same at this time~ It so happened yesterday that a new idea came up for the beginning of the story and it totally changed my initial planning for the start. And my main characters don’t have names too for now~ Can’t think of a better one, probably need some name generators LOL~

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