Dream Every Day: Fanfiction That Isn’t

dream plan write

Full disclosure: I used to write fanfiction. A lot. All for one MMORPG called Ragnarok Online, which my husband and I played for around a year. It was where my love for writing fiction resparked, after having dimmed during high school. I’m never sure what’s going to happen when I say I write fanfiction. Plenty of people have no real opinion. Some say they have written or currently are writing fanfiction as well. And some scoff, laugh, roll eyes, or quietly assume the worst about what that means. There are many misconceptions about fanfiction, but that’s not what this post is about.

This post is also not about convincing you to write fanfiction—at least, not precisely.

One of the biggest benefits of fanfiction is that some of the work is already done for you. Characters are already in play, relationships built (or at least started), sometimes a plot is left dangling that you can pick up and run with. At the very least, in the case of a mostly story-less, character-less world like was in the game I wrote for, a setting has already been established—a whole world built, with mechanics in place that I didn’t have to create myself.

Don’t get me wrong; I’m not saying fanfic writers are lazy, but let’s face it—it’s easier to start writing when some of the work has been done. And that’s where I’m going with this post.

As writers, we are often reflections of what we take in. My dad is a blacksmith, and so is my main character’s dad. I have a character that I created long ago who is jovial, always enthusiastic, outgoing, and sometimes annoying; in recent years I actually met someone in real life who reminds me of that character, so now when I write that character, I keep this other person in mind as a guide.

Errol

Now when I write Aeldrim’s dialog, I think to myself, “What would Errol say?”

The same can be said for books we read, movies or television we watch, or even music we listen to.

A major character in my story “Outcast” was partially inspired by Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, mostly in that I decided to give her a physical mark that reminded people of her mistake.

I have grand plans for a dramatic scene in a story that I never finished when I was writing fanfiction (but will likely pick back up someday and finish in my new story world) that was heavily inspired by a song called “Letters From War” by Mark Schultz.

And the entire premise of a short story I wrote years back was drawn upon the question, “What if the girl had to save the guy?” which I asked myself after watching a movie with my sisters. (For years now I’ve been certain it was the movie Last Holiday that led me to that, but after rewatching the climax to that movie, I don’t see how it could have been. So now I’m not sure what the movie was.)

As a whole, writers get ideas and inspiration from everyday life all the time, so none of this is special. Most writers that I talk to seem to always be neck-deep in ideas that they have to choose between when deciding what to work on next. This advice is more about what you can do if you’re looking for new material. A fresh idea, a different direction to take your plot, or a new character to introduce.

In the book Now Write! Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror, there is an article about taking an existing story and simply adding a different element to it. Examples were moving the story to space, adding dragons, setting it in an alternate dimension, or adding time travel. The idea is not to literally rewrite the same story with the same exact plot with that one added element, but to use that as a starting point. Once you start plotting and/or writing, you make it your own. By the time you’re done, it will most likely look very different from the original.

And that is really where I’m going with this post. Take a cue from fanfic writers and let other stories around you inspire you. What you liked or didn’t like about them, what you’d change or how you think it would have continued.

Dream for yourself: For the rest of this post, understand that “story” can refer to any work of fiction in any medium—print, big or small screen (even a single episode out of a series), or audio.

Think of a story you really liked, but just didn’t like the ending. Or wish a character had been given a different side-plot. How would you have done it differently? What would have been better?

Or think of a story you absolutely hated. Starting with the same premise and same characters (or different characters, if they were part of what made the story so horrible), rewrite it so it’s better.

What character do you really despise? I don’t mean the kind that are meant to be hated, but one that fell flat for you. The character who grated on your nerves. Who was meant to be a comic relief but was just stupid. Or maybe one who was indeed an antagonist, but the villain factor was taken too far. Even a protagonist who you just didn’t sympathize with and couldn’t care less if they lived or died. What would you have done differently? How would you have made that character better for the story?

Yes, this is what some fanfiction writers do. But it doesn’t have to turn into literal fanfiction. If you do not purposely hold yourself to the world the original story is set in, you can make it your own. Or simply use these questions to spark an entirely different idea.

So how about you? Are you now or have you ever been a fanfic writer? Have you noticed real life or fictional stories seeping their way into your writing?

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2 thoughts on “Dream Every Day: Fanfiction That Isn’t

  1. I have read fanfiction, but never wrote it myself. However, I’ve never really understood the negative mindset that so many people have when they think about it. As you said, every writer takes from other ideas, from real life, etc. Nothing is entirely original. I think too many people think of fanfiction as “bad writing” as well, but I’ve read some wonderful pieces, so I can only think they’re reading the wrong works, or that maybe they’re making assumptions without reading any at all.

    That said, I can’t remember a time I’ve purposefully taken from another work in my writing. I’m sure it happens — sometimes I will look back and see the connections to what I was reading or watching, or what was happening in my life at the time. But for the most part my stories feel “original” when I’m writing them, even when a huge part of me knows they’re not. I let myself believe that mostly because I tend to panic if my work is too similar to something else — I’ve not written pieces that I probably should have, for that reason.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I figure people who look down on fanfiction as bad writing probably have one of two main reasons: either they just assume that if someone writes fanfiction, it’s because they’re not good enough to write anything else, or they’ve read examples that are picked specifically because of how bad they are and think that’s all there is.

    I have trouble thinking that my story might be similar to something else too. I’ve had more than one idea based on logical thinking that was very similar to something in existence (it’s difficult to explain without giving examples). Depending on what that idea is, I may take a pass on it, but sometimes I use it anyway. In the end, because none of us do live in a bubble, we know the same ideas will be picked up and used by different people over and over. The main bulk of stories I’m working on right now I feel like are very original, especially one main element that will be subtly weaved throughout many books before coming to light. I would be disappointed by not terribly surprised (well, I’ll admit, I’d be a little surprised) if someone came to me and showed me how it’s all been done before.

    Thanks for commenting!

    Like

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